Tucson's Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum's Blooming Torch Cacti

Updated on May 3, 2019
Chuck profile image

Chuck enjoys both the beauty of the great outdoors and the challenge of finding and photographing its wild inhabitants both big and small.

Red Flower on a Torch Cactus
Red Flower on a Torch Cactus | Source

Blooming Torch Cacti at Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

Recently my wife saw an announcement that the spectacular flowers on the Torch Cacti in the Cactus Garden at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum in Tucson were blooming.

Last year and the year before, we spent many days and hours hiking around the Saguaro National Park West, which lies a couple miles or so north of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum and both of which are less than a 45-minute drive from our home.

Did You Know?

Torch Cacti have a large flower at end of a stem growing from the cactus. A new cactus can be grown by breaking off the stem and planting it in the ground.

White Flower on a 'Big Bertha' Torch Cactus (The common name for this white-flowered  torch cactus is 'Big Bertha.')
White Flower on a 'Big Bertha' Torch Cactus (The common name for this white-flowered torch cactus is 'Big Bertha.') | Source

Torch Cacti Are Not Native to Arizona

As its name implies, Saguaro National Park West is home to hundreds of the iconic Saguaro Cacti as well as a number of species of prickly pear, cholla, barrel and other cacti all of which flower in the spring.

Unlike the cacti in Saguaro National Park which are native species growing wild in the National Park, the torch cacti at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum are not native to Arizona. Instead, they hail from similar desert areas in South America.

Torch cacti also differ from the native cacti in that they are hybrids whose large, beautiful flowers are the product of selective breeding by horticulturalists. I suspect that these cacti have always had beautiful flowers but the flowers were probably not as large as those on the hybrids. In addition to the size of the flowers, all of these may have had flowers that were the same color where now some have white flowers, some red and others yellow.

Two red flowers were blooming on this torch cactus. A single torch cactus may produce many flowers. (Note stem on flower on the left; cutting this off and planting in the ground is one way to start a new torch cactus.)
Two red flowers were blooming on this torch cactus. A single torch cactus may produce many flowers. (Note stem on flower on the left; cutting this off and planting in the ground is one way to start a new torch cactus.) | Source

Flowers of Torch Cactus Only Last One Day or Less

Like the Saguaro and some other species of cacti, the flowers on the torch cactus tend to bloom at night or early morning and wither between the middle and end of the day.

We first saw them shortly after we arrived in mid-morning. There were flowers in full bloom along with tightly wrapped buds. A docent told us that because the day was relatively cool (close to 80° and dry) the flowers were still in good shape but would wither and die by nightfall.

We ended up spending the entire day at the museum and returned to the Cactus Garden late in the afternoon just before the museum closed at 5:00.

The white Big Bertha blooms were withering while the red flowers on nearby Torch Cacti still looked pretty good. Also, some of the buds on the Big Bertha that had been tightly closed in the morning were starting to open.

One, which was open the most in the late afternoon the opening actually appeared over the course of 30 minutes or so to be a few centimeters wider than it had been 30 minutes earlier. I image it was in full bloom later that night.

This 'Big Bertha's' flowers were wilting while new buds began to open. This is same 'Big Bertha' cactus as the one above, but this photo was taken 5 hours after first. Note the flowers now wilting and other buds starting to open.
This 'Big Bertha's' flowers were wilting while new buds began to open. This is same 'Big Bertha' cactus as the one above, but this photo was taken 5 hours after first. Note the flowers now wilting and other buds starting to open. | Source

Big Bertha Flower Above Is Beginning to Wilt

Compare the picture above with the one at the beginning of the article. Both are pictures of the same plant. However, the first photo of the plant was taken in mid-morning while the one immediately above was taken about 4:30 in the afternoon.

In the first one, the four buds on top of the cactus are tightly closed while the flower below them is in its prime. However, in the picture above, the bud on the top left is starting to open and the three to its right are on the verge of opening while the flower below is starting to wilt and die.

As the Bishop's Miter cactus (Birrete De Obispo) ages, tiny grey hairs multiply on the plant.  Grey  hairs cover this old cactus, giving it a metallic silver look, but age doesn't stop it from flowering.
As the Bishop's Miter cactus (Birrete De Obispo) ages, tiny grey hairs multiply on the plant. Grey hairs cover this old cactus, giving it a metallic silver look, but age doesn't stop it from flowering. | Source

A Beautiful Old Bishop's Miter Cactus From Mexico

The torch cacti are but one group in the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum's cactus collection. While most of the cacti are in the Cactus Garden location there are some in other parts of the Museum.

The Bishop's Miter Cactus in the picture above is another species of cactus a group of which were growing in another part of the museum grounds. This species of cactus is native to north and central Mexico.

These cacti have a single stem and are slow growing. The stem on many of them have a gentle corkscrew shape. Flowers only appear after many years.

It seems that over time, tiny grey hairs grow on the green stem. The cacti in the picture has been completely covered with these hairs making the cactus look like it is covered with some type of silver-colored corrosion. Younger ones don't have any of these hairs while slightly older ones have small clumps or spots of grey hairs.

Strawberry Hedgehog Cacti (Echinocereus brandegeei) are small, but they produce large flowers for their size.
Strawberry Hedgehog Cacti (Echinocereus brandegeei) are small, but they produce large flowers for their size. | Source

Strawberry Hedgehog Cactus

There are a number of types of Hedgehog cacti, all small ranging in size from about three to six inches for the smaller types to about ten inches for larger types. All of them that I have seen have large flowers that are generally found in various shades of purple.

This particular variety is native to the Mexican state of Baja California Sur (the southern part of the Baja California peninsula that lies between the Gulf of California and the Pacific Ocean just south of the U.S.border with Mexico).

Various types of hedgehog cactus are common throughout the southwestern U.S. and Mexico. They begin blooming in the spring with some, like the Strawberry Hedgehog cactus above, blooming throughout the summer.

Golden Hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus nicholii) bloom in April and are native to Southern Arizona and the Mexican State of Sonora that borders Arizona on the south.
Golden Hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus nicholii) bloom in April and are native to Southern Arizona and the Mexican State of Sonora that borders Arizona on the south. | Source

Cactus Garden Is Just One Small Part of Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

While the purpose of that day's visit was to see and take pictures of the cactus, there is much more the museum than the Cactus Garden.

In the seven hours or so that we spent wandering the 2 miles of paved trails that wind through the 98-acre facility, we got to visit other parts of the museum as well. While it is possible to visit the entire facility in 3–5 hours, we were in no hurry and were focused mainly on taking pictures (it is not uncommon for my wife to spend time taking and deleting up to 50 or more pictures of an object or scene before she has the picture she wants) of the numerous blooming cacti.

Hummingbird Nopal (Nopalea Karwinskiana) Cactus in Bloom Among the Torch Cacti
Hummingbird Nopal (Nopalea Karwinskiana) Cactus in Bloom Among the Torch Cacti | Source

Hummingbird Nopal Cactus: Beautiful Flowers and Tasty Fruit

The Hummingbird Nopal Cactus in the photo above is not a torch cactus but is instead a member of the prickly pear cactus family. The delicate flowers on the cactus attract hummingbirds (hence the name) as well as bees and butterflies as pollinators.

Like the more common prickly pear variety, the Nopal variety also produces a sweet fruit that can be eaten directly or crushed to produce juice, jams or jellies. It also has some medicinal properties.

This cactus is native to the Western Hemisphere and can tolerate drought and, to some extent, moderate cold. It can be grown indoors as well as outdoors where it can grow to several feet in height.

Like the other cacti discussed here these cactus species, along with many others, can be purchased in nurseries or online.

Among the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum's numerous animal species is the Hummingbird Aviary, containing all 5 types of hummingbirds found in Arizona and Sonora.
Among the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum's numerous animal species is the Hummingbird Aviary, containing all 5 types of hummingbirds found in Arizona and Sonora. | Source

Speaking of Hummingbirds . . .

We didn't spend the entire time in the Cactus Garden.

Despite spending considerable time in the Cactus Garden and returning to visit it during our all-day visit to the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, we also visited some of the other animal and garden areas while we crisscrossed the vast area covered by the museum. It was a relatively cool (temperature in low 80s) day with low humidity.

Of course this is Arizona which, among the many other things it is known for is skin cancer, we lathered up with sunscreen a couple of times. We used our own 50 SPF sunscreen that we brought with us, but there were also dispensers in all the restrooms dispensing 30 SPF sunscreen.

With over 400 thousand visitors annually, the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is a great place to visit, especially during the cooler months of October through April. The museum is open 8:30–5:00 October through February and 7:30–5:00 March through September.

Desert Bighorn Sheep, almost extinct by early 1900s now thrive in the low desert mountains of Arizona. This one was busy climbing his outdoor enclosure at the desert museum.
Desert Bighorn Sheep, almost extinct by early 1900s now thrive in the low desert mountains of Arizona. This one was busy climbing his outdoor enclosure at the desert museum. | Source

Desert Museum in Relation to Downtown Tucson and Tucson International Airport

A
Tucson International airport:
Tucson International Airport (TUS), 7250 S Tucson Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85756, USA

get directions

B
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum:
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, 2021 N Kinney Rd, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA

get directions

C
Downtown Tucson:
Downtown, Tucson, AZ, USA

get directions

Questions & Answers

    © 2019 Chuck Nugent

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment
      • Chuck profile imageAUTHOR

        Chuck Nugent 

        5 months ago from Tucson, Arizona

        Peggy Woods - Thanks for your comments. I'm glad you enjoyed the Hub and pictures. These cactus flowers are amazing and I am happy to share them on Hub pages with others.

      • Chuck profile imageAUTHOR

        Chuck Nugent 

        5 months ago from Tucson, Arizona

        Heidi Thorne - thanks for your comments, I'm glad you enjoyed the Hub. As I indicated in the Hub my wife and I enjoyed our day viewing and photographing the cacti. If you ever have the opportunity to visit southern Arizona I encourage you to do it in the spring especially after a winter of good rainfall as the cactus, wildflowers and other flora are abundant and beautiful.

      • Peggy W profile image

        Peggy Woods 

        5 months ago from Houston, Texas

        Your photos and descriptions of the blooming cactus, hummingbird and more are always so enjoyable to view and read. Nice way to start this day!

      • heidithorne profile image

        Heidi Thorne 

        5 months ago from Chicago Area

        OMG, Chuck! These photos are amazingly beautiful. I'm fascinated by cacti and succulents, even though they aren't possible in our area, except in indoor greenhouses. Thanks for sharing these with us!

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, wanderwisdom.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://wanderwisdom.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
      ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)