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Tim Bailey Sculpture in Eleanor Tinsley Park Houston

I live in Houston, and I have worked as a nurse. My interests include art, traveling, reading, gardening, cooking, and our wonderful pets.

Tim Bailey Sculpture titled "Shady Grove" in Eleanor Tinsley Park, Houston

Tim Bailey Sculpture titled "Shady Grove" in Eleanor Tinsley Park, Houston

Donation to City of Houston

The Tim Bailey Sculpture in Eleanor Tinsley Park was dedicated to the City of Houston by this generous sculptor in the year 2002.

The marker pictured below gives the dimensions of this sculpture as being ten by 20 by 20 feet. This piece of art is made of steel and created in 1987. It has a rusty, weathered orangy brown coloration.

Marker to Shady Grove sculpture in Eleanor Tinsley Park

Marker to Shady Grove sculpture in Eleanor Tinsley Park

Artist and Blacksmith

This Cor-Ten steel sculpture is titled “Shady Grove.” It sits in a grove of surrounding trees, including Southern Magnolia Trees, among other types. Iris and other bulbous plants were about to bloom the year I took these photos.

In recent photos taken of this sculpture, the vegetation has significantly grown and now indeed resembles a shady grove.

Interestingly Tim Bailey is not only an artist but also a blacksmith. He gets to combine business with pleasure that way. I use the word “pleasure” because it is always gratifying when art is created to the satisfaction of the artist.

In reading his bio, he is also a certified welding inspector. In the past, he taught sculpture classes at North Harris County Community College.

Mr. Bailey is a board member of HABA (Houston Area Blacksmith’s Association). His studio shop is the Schill Steel building at 3001 W 11th St, 77008.

Shady Grove sculpture in Eleanor Tinsley Park

Shady Grove sculpture in Eleanor Tinsley Park

Sculptures in Eleanor Tinsley Park

This weathered steel sculpture is available to view by drivers on Allen Parkway as well as people hiking or biking in this delightful park near downtown Houston.

I did not realize until recently that this sculpture honors victims of crime. Pavers in the ground depict service organizations committed to helping those local crime victims. Steel, as a medium, symbolically suggests toughness and resistance to whatever may occur in life.

The Tolerance Sculptures in Eleanor Tinsley Park take on additional significance knowing now the interpretation of the Tim Bailey sculpture. The other significant piece of sculptural art in Eleanor Tinsley Park is the voluptuous bronze one by Henry Moore.

“Art-making is not about telling the truth but making the truth felt.”

— Christian Boltanski

Accessibility

The photo below shows the parking lot we used when visiting the sculptures in Eleanor Tinsley Park. Now it is no longer accessible except to the press. However, the good news is that many more metered parking spaces have been created all along this park. Thus, it is much easier to access this recreational area near downtown Houston.

This part of Eleanor Tinsley Park is the closest to the "Shady Grove" sculpture by Tim Bailey. The address is 500 Allen Parkway, Houston, Texas 77002.

From the parking lot, one overlooks a vast lawn area looking towards downtown Houston. People can spend leisure time there throwing balls or frisbees, flying kites, spreading a blanket on the lawn and enjoying a picnic lunch, playing badminton, and more.

Many trails circumvent this park along Buffalo Bayou and extend in both directions towards downtown and heading out west for many miles.

I found a video showing just how close to downtown Houston this park is. It does not show all the fascinating features of Eleanor Tinsley Park, which is a portion of the more massive Buffalo Bayou Park. However, it highlights our beautiful downtown skyline plus the Tim Bailey sculpture and some of the trails on either side of Buffalo Bayou.

Sources

Artist Blacksmith, Tim Bailey

Eleanor Tinsley Park

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 Peggy Woods

Comments

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on August 07, 2020:

Hi George,

You are correct in that there are many intriguing sculptures along Allen Parkway in Houston. It makes for some great sightseeing!

George on August 07, 2020:

Sculptures abound along Allen Parkway. This is just one more reminder of the artistic beauty available in Houston.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on April 21, 2020:

Hi Pamela,

Being a blacksmith and an artist is a good combination in this instance. I like this Tim Bailey sculpture. Thanks for your comment.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on April 18, 2020:

Hi Ann,

It is interesting to see the purpose behind this sculpture. The landscaping has really grown up around it since the first time we noticed the sculpture.

Ann Carr from SW England on April 17, 2020:

I wrote a comment some time back but maybe I didn't press the button! It's unusual, this one. I like the concept behind it and I'd love to see it with all the shrubbery around it.

Ann

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on April 16, 2020:

Hi Pamela,

I understand. We do not necessarily all like the same kind of art, but it is great that there is a variety of it.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on April 16, 2020:

Hi Ruby,

The setting of this piece of sculpture is indeed beautiful.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on April 16, 2020:

Hi Heidi,

I am pleased that you enjoyed looking at this sculpture and what it is supposed to represent. Thanks for your visit and comment.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on April 14, 2020:

I don't think I have ever heard of a park that honors victims of crime. That is truly unique and nice. The sculpture is interesting and the view of the large buildings in Houston is also good. Being a blacksmith seems so much differest than being an artist and Tim Bailey apparently excells as both. This is a very good review of this park, Peggy.

Ann Carr from SW England on April 14, 2020:

Another fascinating part of your city, Peggy. I'd love to see it now that the trees have grown around it. Honouring victims of crime is certainly a wonderful reason for creating this. Sculpture is so versatile.

Ann

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on April 14, 2020:

Hi FlourishAnyway,

Honoring crime victims is an excellent purpose of this particular piece of art.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on April 13, 2020:

It is amazing how many parks with sculptures are available in Houston. I wouldm't say this is my favoirite sculpture but is is certainly unique.

Ruby Jean Richert from Southern Illinois on April 13, 2020:

I like the idea of this piece of sculpture was made to honor victims of crime, how thoughtful that is. I also like the skyline of Houston is close. So many beautiful parks in and around Houston.

Heidi Thorne from Chicago Area on April 13, 2020:

Has a very Picasso kind of appeal. Love it. Thanks for sharing another cool site in your area. Cheers!

FlourishAnyway from USA on April 13, 2020:

I like that there are underlying messages connected to the art in that crime victims are honored. It’s a tribute to their resilience.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on April 13, 2020:

Hi Liz,

I agree. Our public art is like the frosting on the cake. It beautifies the scenery around it, adding interest.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on April 13, 2020:

Hi Adrienne,

I should work for the Chamber of Commerce. Ha! We are blessed with so many fascinating and exciting things to do and see in our city.

Liz Westwood from UK on April 13, 2020:

You certainly have an interesting collection of sculptures around Houston, all well-documented in your interesting articles.

Adrienne Farricelli on April 13, 2020:

All your articles about Houston are increasing my desire to come visit one day. There are so many interesting things to see!