The Magic of Bighorn Medicine Wheel

Updated on January 12, 2018
cclitgirl profile image

Cynthia is a writer, artist, and teacher. She loves studying language, arts, and culture, and sharing that knowledge.

Bighorn Medicine Wheel is a sacred place.
Bighorn Medicine Wheel is a sacred place. | Source

Visiting Medicine Mountain

I discovered Bighorn Medicine Wheel when I was reading a book called Sacred Places Around the World. The medicine wheel was only one of a few sacred places listed in North America. It's over 10,000 years old and no one knows why or by whom it was created.

Native American Indians call the medicine wheel "The Place Where the Eagle Lands."

On a recent road trip, I knew I had to incorporate this place into my travels.

We approached Medicine Mountain from the east driving west. Just a couple miles from the sacred place, there is a stop where you can get a view of Medicine Mountain.

There are granite rock formations that sit high on these mountains. We were probably about 8,000 feet in elevation just as we got to the entrance.

Medicine Mountain has an observatory near its summit, as well. It's no wonder: there is no urban development in this area at all. The skies are completely clear and free of any light pollution at night.

The view from the "point of interest" just east of Medicine Mountain. You can see the observatory.
The view from the "point of interest" just east of Medicine Mountain. You can see the observatory. | Source
Still at the "point of interest," rain clouds approached. The high elevation means that Medicine Mountain often gets its own weather.
Still at the "point of interest," rain clouds approached. The high elevation means that Medicine Mountain often gets its own weather. | Source

Walking to the Medicine Wheel

When you turn to go to Medicine Mountain, the road isn't paved. It's another quick ascent up the side of the mountain, as well.

If you have a fear of heights, just be prepared.

But once you arrive at the parking lot, you still have a mile and a half to walk toward the wheel itself.

It becomes sort of a pilgrimage: you take in the natural scenery and beauty, you notice wildflowers, and even tiny animals called pikas.

Something starts to happen while you're walking, too. An electric, yet humble feeling comes over you as you enter sacred ground.

The "pilgrimage" to the medicine wheel. This is the same trail different tribes have used for 10,000 years to travel to the wheel.
The "pilgrimage" to the medicine wheel. This is the same trail different tribes have used for 10,000 years to travel to the wheel. | Source

The Medicine Wheel in the Bighorn Mountains

A
Bighorn Medicine Wheel, WY:
Medicine Wheel, Lovell, WY 82431, USA

get directions

Along the walk, you see evidence of what was once part of an inland ocean, and small critters such as the pika.
Along the walk, you see evidence of what was once part of an inland ocean, and small critters such as the pika. | Source

High Altitude Tips

  • Be sure the air in your tires is NOT at maximum pressure as you ascend into the mountains. It is a quick ascent. Their pressure will increase as you go up and can cause a blowout.
  • If you have food in the car (like I did), be sure to have it contained in bags. What I mean is that we had a watermelon wrapped in a grocery bag. It cracked and effectively exploded its contents as we made our ascent!
  • Bags of chips will also burst open if you're coming from much lower altitude.
  • If you go into high altitude from low altitude (less than 3,500 ft), your best bet is not to stay there overnight. Acclimation is important to stave off headaches and altitude sickness.
  • Make sure you drink enough water that your urine is clear, but not so much you need to stop multiple times on the side of the road. There are limited restroom facilities.

About the Medicine Wheel

When you arrive after your walk, something happens. You start to feel a sense of awe for what is 10,000 years old.

In fact, the road people walk to get there is the same trail that Native American Indian tribes have been using for as many years!

When you walk up to the wheel, there is a path to walk around it that goes clockwise. You can't enter beyond the fence itself unless you're an American Indian participating in a religious ceremony.

It's quite the meditative experience: you're just down the summit of Medicine Mountain, named for the medicine wheel. The summit is about 10,000 feet. The trees and plants that grow there are hardy and the land itself is rocky.

The medicine wheel, however, is the focal point. The stones that make up the wheel form a pattern that looks a little like a wagon wheel. No one can tell you why tribes of another era created this wheel at this exact spot, but once you've walked it, you begin to understand that there is something - a buzzing, awed feeling - you get at this place.

This place, as well as the surrounding Bighorn Mountains had been a traditional scared place for many tribes throughout history. Tribal members would come to these mountains for religious purposes or for ceremonial purposes.

Other medicine wheels exist in the Bighorn Mountains. However, this one is the most well-known and considered the most sacred.

In fact, all over the Bighorn Mountain range, other wheels, caves and sites exist that natives consider very sacred.

First view of Bighorn Medicine Wheel.
First view of Bighorn Medicine Wheel. | Source

Wheel Construction

The rocks of the medicine wheel create a circle about 80 feet in diameter. There are twenty eight spokes. There are certain spokes that line up with the sun's path during seasonal equinoxes.

The small circles to the outside of the circle probably held teepees and other objects in place.

You walk clockwise around the circle along the trail. Visitors cannot enter the area unless you are part of a Native American Indian tribe.
You walk clockwise around the circle along the trail. Visitors cannot enter the area unless you are part of a Native American Indian tribe. | Source

Offerings

Around the fence of the wheel, American Indians leave flags, scarves, amulets, and other personal items. Non-native visitors may not leave physical items out of respect for the native folks who do.

Folks have even left deer, bison, or bear bones and skulls.

These items are a token of remembrance, or they can represent a prayer. Bones from animals often represent a totem or even a power animal.

Over time, many people have left a number of artifacts.

I know when I approached all these beautiful items, I couldn't help but gaze in awe at the memories, thoughts, and ideas that all make up the sanctity of the medicine wheel.

Offerings sometimes include skulls.
Offerings sometimes include skulls. | Source
A view of some of the "spokes" of the wheel.
A view of some of the "spokes" of the wheel. | Source

"Everything the Power of the World does is done in a circle. The sky is round. The earth is round like a ball, and so are all the stars. The life of a man is a circle from childhood to childhood, and so it is in everything where power moves."

— -Black Elk of the Lakota Sioux

This is an an abbreviated quote found on an information plaque on the path up to the medicine wheel.

Extra rocks arranged in a circle on the outer edges of the medicine wheel may have been used to anchor teepees or other similar items.
Extra rocks arranged in a circle on the outer edges of the medicine wheel may have been used to anchor teepees or other similar items. | Source
My favorite photo of the medicine wheel. It's hauntingly beautiful with a feather in the foreground.
My favorite photo of the medicine wheel. It's hauntingly beautiful with a feather in the foreground. | Source

Interesting Little Known Fact About the Wheel

In the early 1900s, people studying the wheel found a set of beads that "just didn't belong." They sent the beads to New York for testing.

They found that the beads were at least 300 years old and that they had originated in Venice.

Though it's not impossible that Venetian beads would appear in such a remote area, it's still remarkable. That means in the early 1600s, someone that had connections to Venice was up at the Medicine Wheel!

It's fun to speculate. Did the beads get there through trade? Or did a Venetian resident sail at sea and make a thousands of miles trek to the remote wilderness by chance?

Members of the different tribes who came to an agreement about how the medicine wheel would be used are commemorated on plaques.
Members of the different tribes who came to an agreement about how the medicine wheel would be used are commemorated on plaques. | Source

More About the Medicine Wheel

Many throughout history have speculated why the medicine wheel exists.

Some have thought it was a destination for vision quests, that it is a place for inspiration, or that it commemorates the solstice. Still, others say it is a reproduction of the Sun Dance Lodge of the Crow.

More than 80 tribes use the wheel for religious purposes to this day.

In the 1970s and 80s, these tribes had been in contention as to whom had true rights to the wheel. The US government intervened and held talks with the leaders and chiefs of these tribes. They came to a consensus that the wheel could be used by all these tribes at different times.

Now, there is no contention, just thoughts of peace.

As you walk along the trail toward the Medicine Wheel, you can see names on golden plaques of the leaders who participated in that process.

All visitors are welcome. However, native tribes and park rangers ask for utmost respect as people visit. It is a matter of respecting others' beliefs, just as someone would respect a church or other place of worship.

Questions & Answers

    © 2016 Cynthia Calhoun

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • cclitgirl profile imageAUTHOR

        Cynthia Calhoun 

        22 months ago from Western NC

        Thank you, Larry!

      • Larry Rankin profile image

        Larry Rankin 

        22 months ago from Oklahoma

        Great read!

      • cclitgirl profile imageAUTHOR

        Cynthia Calhoun 

        22 months ago from Western NC

        Sha - thank you so much for coming by! Yes, I loved visiting all these places and...must visit some more! :D

        Sending hugs!

      • bravewarrior profile image

        Shauna L Bowling 

        22 months ago from Central Florida

        You visited some very interesting places in your recent travels, Cyndi. Thank you for sharing your experiences with us!

      • cclitgirl profile imageAUTHOR

        Cynthia Calhoun 

        22 months ago from Western NC

        Glenn - hey, thanks! I appreciate your feedback. And yes, reading that book definitely inspired me to want to go see this. In fact, that same book makes me want to go see many more sacred places. :) Hope you're well on this fine Sunday!

      • Glenn Stok profile image

        Glenn Stok 

        22 months ago from Long Island, NY

        This was an extremely interesting review Cynthia. It's amazing that the Medicine Wheel is still a common thing among many tribes today. It's always so much more exciting to know about the history when visiting various places. It helps appreciate one's experience when traveling.

      • cclitgirl profile imageAUTHOR

        Cynthia Calhoun 

        22 months ago from Western NC

        Rebecca - hey, hey! Thanks so much! Yes, it was pretty epic - and there is still so MANY places we haven't seen. Have to do more road trips. :D

        Hope you're well. Happy Saturday!

      • rebeccamealey profile image

        Rebecca Mealey 

        22 months ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

        Beautiful hub, Cyndi. You saw so many interesting places on your trip. And I'll bet it made the trip 100 percent more special to read and study about them beforehand!

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, wanderwisdom.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://wanderwisdom.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)