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Noah Beach Campground, Cape Tribulation, Daintree National Park, North Queensland, Australia

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Noah Beach (Looking North)

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

The purpose of this website its to provide you with extra information which I believe will be helpful to anyone interested in camping at Noah Beach Campgrounds.

Noah Beach is located in the Daintree National Park on the north eastern coast of Australia. It is in the state of Queensland and is approximately a 2 hours drive north of Cairns. Port Douglas is also to the south of Noah Beach by approximately a 1 hour drive. With Cape Tribulation just to the north the wet tropics and world heritage listed rainforest is at your doorstep if you choose to camp here at Noah Beach Campgrounds.

Noah Beach Campgrounds are managed by the Queensland Government, Department of Parks and Wildlife. They are the only easily accessible campgrounds managed by the Queensland Government in the Daintree National Park.

Noah Beach Campgrounds are a group of fifteen (15) individual campsites. Each campsite has its own advantages and disadvantages. If you download the Noah Beach Campground map from the above link you can use the map together with the photos to get an idea of each campsite. That is, you should be able to see which campsites are larger than others, which campsites have more shade, better beach access or toilet access.

The following photos are in order from campsite 1 to 15. They are all different sized campsites. One thing you may not notice is that all campsites have a raised square section (to allow for raised sleeping from any rain downpours) except campsite 11.

All campsites have timber bollards and fencing around them to protect the vegetation but make it hard to get your vehicle close to your camping area. This is difficult if you want to run 12 volt lights or electrics from your vehicle or if you want to access your vehicle for food etc.

All campsites have compacted gravel around the tent areas. This makes it difficult to drive tent pegs into the ground, but this may not be a problem if you are using a dome tent (which you will not really need to secure your tent down with pegs as they are relatively self standing).

Campsites closer to the beach are better for capturing offshore breezes as the dense rainforest's growth can be quite a wind break and it can get very humid in the warmer months.

Noah Beach Campsite 1

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 2

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 3

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 4

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 5

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 6

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 7

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

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Noah Beach Campsite 8

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 9

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 10

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 11

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 12

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 13

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 14

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach Campsite 15

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Wildlife at Noah Beach

Noah Beach wildlife is amazing and it is as the sign says below, "A wild night, every night!" The sign is like a check sheet for all the creatures that you will see during the day and night. While we were camping at Noah Beach we saw, White-tailed rats feasting on coconuts, Orange-footed scrubfowls creating their huge nests, Lace monitor lizards and Northern brown bandicoots foraging at night.

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

This is a video that I took of the Orange-footed scrubfowls guarding their nest. When we approached they gave their warning call. The nest itself is amazing as it stood 3 metres (10 foot) from the rainforest floor. These nest are so tall to escape the monsoonal floods and to ensure their eggs and young are high and dry.

The scrubfowl has quite strong and sharp claws for building its nest and scratching around in the leaf litter to look for grubs and insects.

Orange-footed scrubfowl foraging

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

We heard this Lace monitor crawling through the leaf litter as I was checking out an abandoned scrubfowl nest. When I came close to the Lace monitor he flattened out his body to get as close to the leaf litter as possible. I think he was trying to hide from me and he did a pretty good job. I was sure to give him plenty of room to carry on his way.

Lace monitor

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

These Northern Brown Bandicoots are nocturnal and are quite shy. We managed to get this night photo as he was feasting on some dropped fruit.

Northern Brown Bandicoot

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach (Looking south)

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Noah Beach is not a large beach, however it is quite secluded. There is no chance of surfing as the waves are reduced in size from The Great Barrier Reef. There are crocodile warning signs but this is for the creek to the south of the beach. In summer you have to be careful of jellyfish stings, but otherwise swimming here is okay.

Noah Beach (Northern Point)

Image by LeonJane

Image by LeonJane

Questions & Answers

Question: Is my Mazda 3 suitable for the road condition?

Answer: Yes, you will be able to get to Noah Beach in a conventional vehicle, like a Mazda 3, you'll also be able to drive into the campgrounds off of the main bitumen road as it is compacted gravel. If you drive further north, 13 km past Cape Tribulation, you will need a 4x4 vehicle at the Emmagen Creek crossing, but up until there, it will be okay for you.

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