Landmark Williams Water Wall in Galleria Area of Houston

Updated on April 18, 2020
Peggy W profile image

I live in Houston, and I have worked as a nurse. My interests include art, traveling, reading, gardening, cooking, and our wonderful pets.

Williams Water Wall in Houston, Texas
Williams Water Wall in Houston, Texas | Source

Houston Landmark

The Williams Water Wall is in the Houston Galleria and Uptown Park part of our city. It is situated opposite the tall and impressive 64 story office building called the Williams Tower.

Many of us long time Houstonians still call it the Transco Tower. It had that name for a long time as Transco Energy Co. became its first major tenant. Habits are hard to change! It is because of a merger that it now bears the name of Williams Tower.

The Williams Tower is visible from many parts of our city because of its height. Most buildings that size are in downtown areas. It still ranks as the 4th tallest building in Texas. It is also ranked as the tallest building in the entire United States that is not in a central business district.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Williams TowerWilliams Tower lit up at night showing the word TEXANS
The Williams Tower
The Williams Tower | Source
Williams Tower lit up at night showing the word TEXANS
Williams Tower lit up at night showing the word TEXANS | Source

Tourist Attraction

One of the many places around Houston considered to be a tourist attraction is the huge mall called the Galleria. Many people from other countries as well as tourists from our own country come to shop here.

The Williams Tower completed in 1982 towers over the Galleria on its southeastern edge. The Williams Water Wall had the original name of Transco Fountain but was also renamed after the merger.

People from Galleria I can easily walk over to this impressive fountain from that location. Parking is free at the Galleria and parking around the water wall is extremely limited. So I would highly recommend taking advantage of that opportunity to park one's vehicle if wishing to spend some time at this landmark spot.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The tallest building in this photo is the Williams Tower (formerly called the Transco Tower.) Note the curved water wall opposite the grassy area of the building near the bottom left of the photo.Williams Tower with part of the Galleria in foregroundNight photo of the tall Williams Tower
The tallest building in this photo is the Williams Tower (formerly called the Transco Tower.) Note the curved water wall opposite the grassy area of the building near the bottom left of the photo.
The tallest building in this photo is the Williams Tower (formerly called the Transco Tower.) Note the curved water wall opposite the grassy area of the building near the bottom left of the photo. | Source
Williams Tower with part of the Galleria in foreground
Williams Tower with part of the Galleria in foreground | Source
Night photo of the tall Williams Tower
Night photo of the tall Williams Tower | Source

Gerald D. Hines Waterwall Park

The Williams Water Wall was initially privately owned, but as of 2008, it was purchased by the city of Houston. The 2.77 acres including the water wall fountain is now called the Gerald D. Hines Waterwall Park.

Gerald D. Hines has been a very successful developer in Houston. In addition to the Galleria in both Houston and Dallas as well as the Williams Tower, he has been responsible for many of the high profile commercial office buildings in Houston.

It is nice that this landmark attraction will now be preserved by the city for everyone's enjoyment long into the future.

Source

Landmark Attraction

This semi-circular water wall is concave on the inside and convex as one walks around the exterior of the fountain. It is 64 feet high matching the feet to the number of stories of the Williams Tower.

Admittedly the sound of all of that crashing water is beautiful to hear. The cool mist generated from the constantly circulating water can be refreshing on a hot summer day.

We do not have mountains or naturally occurring waterfalls in Houston, so this Williams Water Wall is the next best thing! If spending any time surrounded by the supercharged air with negative ions one might even feel better physically and mentally. There is some credence to that idea from sources like WebMD and others.

The area between the Williams Tower and the Williams Water Wall is a green grassy area where people can spread blankets and enjoy a picnic lunch if desired or toss balls back and forth.

Photographers flock to this site for many reasons. Graduation photos, as well as events such as engagement photos and even wedding photos, are often taken there. Permits are required for commercial photography, but casual snapshots are allowed. Many people take advantage of that!

Partial view of the Williams Water Wall and the Williams Tower
Partial view of the Williams Water Wall and the Williams Tower | Source

Houston City Park

In addition to the verdant lawn and mesmerizing waterfall, numerous live oak trees add to the ambiance of this lovely city park. In fact, according to what I read, 186 of them have been planted here. The shade is most welcome when Houston temperatures climb upwards.

Several movies have been filmed using this landmark attraction as a backdrop. The Williams Water Wall is an engineering masterpiece where 78,500 gallons of water is continually recirculated. Supposedly 11,000 gallons of water come crashing down every minute!

If you have not taken the time to check out this amazing site for yourself, consider doing so if you are in Houston. Take some pictures of your own and relive the experience of being there in person.

The location of the Williams Water Wall and Gerald D. Hines Waterwall Park is 2800 Post Oak Blvd., Houston, Texas 77056.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Trees in Gerald D. Hines Waterwall ParkWaterwall & glimpse of Williams Tower Backside of WaterwallCascading water inside Williams Waterwall People walking around the Waterwall View of cascading water through one of the arches Cascading water Soothing water sounds of falling water
Trees in Gerald D. Hines Waterwall Park
Trees in Gerald D. Hines Waterwall Park | Source
Waterwall & glimpse of Williams Tower
Waterwall & glimpse of Williams Tower | Source
Backside of Waterwall
Backside of Waterwall | Source
Cascading water inside Williams Waterwall
Cascading water inside Williams Waterwall | Source
People walking around the Waterwall
People walking around the Waterwall | Source
View of cascading water through one of the arches
View of cascading water through one of the arches | Source
Cascading water
Cascading water | Source
Soothing water sounds of falling water
Soothing water sounds of falling water | Source

Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_D._Hines_Waterwall_Park

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 Peggy Woods

Comments

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    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      8 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi FlourishAnyway,

      This is an attraction both day and night. It draws not only Houstonians who like to take their photographs there, but also tourists.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 

      8 weeks ago from USA

      I bet it’s really beautiful to see in person all lit up at night.the trees and green space are lovely.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Bill,

      Many people seem to like this Houston attraction. I hope you and Bev are doing well.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Pamela,

      I am glad that the public is now free to visit and use this land as a park instead of it being private as it used to be. It is quite a tourist attraction!

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      2 months ago from Olympia, WA

      It's pretty amazing, isn't it? I would go see that for sure. Thanks for the brief tour, and Happy Sunday to you, Peggy!

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      2 months ago from Sunny Florida

      The two buildings are beautiful with such unique architecture. I understand why people ome to see them, the view and to take pictures. Yours are wonderful again.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Liz,

      It is truly a spectacular site to visit in person. Many photos are taken there.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      2 months ago from UK

      What a lovely feature to have in Houston. As ever, your photos are excellent.

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