Updated date:

Hornitos California: A Hidden Gold Rush Town

Rochelle's interest in California history was rekindled when she began leading tours at a local museum in an 1850s gold rush town.

Doorway to the past. Native stone and a lot of hard work built structures that still stand strong.

Doorway to the past. Native stone and a lot of hard work built structures that still stand strong.

A small town off the beaten path, Hornitos has existed since before California's statehood. Though it is sometimes called a "gold rush town," it was actually established much earlier by Mexican settlers. The Spanish name "Hornitas" means "little ovens." Some say that the appellation came from the fact that early burials were made in stone tombs resembling outdoor bake ovens because the ground was too rocky to dig graves.

The village did gain notoriety during the gold rush as a place that was home to thieves, roughnecks, gamblers, and various miscreants that had been run out of other "more respectable" settlements. It has the reputation of being the hideout and haven of one of California's most infamous criminals, Juaquin Murrietta, who was said to have committed many robberies and murders in the early 1850's.

Juaquin is long gone, but the memory of him lingers.

Juaquin is long gone, but the memory of him lingers.

Wooden buildings and shacks exist in a state of arrested decay and add to the ghost town aura of Hornitos. If spirits remain, this house seems to be available for occupancy.

Wooden buildings and shacks exist in a state of arrested decay and add to the ghost town aura of Hornitos. If spirits remain, this house seems to be available for occupancy.

None of These

Present day Hornitos has no ATMs, gas stations, traffic signals, supermarkets, dollar stores or restaurants. There are no coffee shops or laundromats or banks. If you are craving a fast burger and fries, you are out of luck here.

It does have one existing bar that is open on weekends. They may serve a few munchies along with beer and Bloody Marys. The gift store down the street at the historic Gagliardo store has a few packaged snacks but specializes in souvenirs, decorative items and works by local artists . . . if it is open.

Ruined Remains of Ghirardelli Store. The first level was built of native stone with a second story of fired brick.

Ruined Remains of Ghirardelli Store. The first level was built of native stone with a second story of fired brick.

As home to rough and rowdy outcasts and desperadoes, Hornitos gained a tainted reputation for mayhem, but there were some respectable souls who did what they could to preserve order and build up the town with honest enterprises.

By 1870, the town was incorporated and had at least three general stores and a couple of cafes in a place that previously hosted only gambling halls and saloons. One of the early businessmen was Domingo Ghirardelli an Italian confectioner. Partial stone and brick walls of what must have been an impressive structure still stand in Hornitos as a reminder of his store. Domingo's chocolates became famous in gold country and he soon moved his enterprise to the San Francisco Bay area. The company he started still thrives today and Ghirardelli chocolate is widely available.

The old jail in Hornitos. At some point it was decided that it didn't really need a front window. There are six-inch windows on two sides.

The old jail in Hornitos. At some point it was decided that it didn't really need a front window. There are six-inch windows on two sides.

This temporary holding cell for horse thieves, gunfighters, and other transgressors, was outfitted with iron rings and shackles to secure individuals until a justice could hear their case and decide if they could be held for trial in nearby Mariposa.

The stone jail is slightly smaller than the Masonic Lodge.

Hornitos Masonic Lodge.

Hornitos Masonic Lodge.

Hornitos Lodge No. 46 F & AM is the smallest Masonic meeting place in California. Constructed of native stone with an interior area of a little more than 500 square feet, the lodge retains an active membership that continues to support the small community.

In the early days, Freemasons were businessmen, miners, builders, and innkeepers as well as farmers and ranchers. They also served as town and county officials. They had a significant positive impact on their community and current members continue to sponsor activities and projects to benefit Hornitos.

hornitos-california-a-hidden-gold-rush-town

The resident population of Hornitos seems to vary according to what data source you reference. The 2010 census lists 75 residents, though the actual number may now be lower. Most prefer the solitude of this quiet town.

Though the permanent residents are few, the visitor population of this community swells during three annual events that attract outsiders from near and far.

Hornitos Patrons Club sponsors community functions to support local charities, scholarships, and the preservation of historical sites in the town.

  • Hornitos Flea Market -- for the past 30 years or so the town has held a multi-vendor sale that attracts buyers and sellers from all over the state on the first Sunday in October. There are usually nearly 100 booths with antiques, collectibles, crafts, and food lining the streets and vying for the attention of buyers.
  • All Souls Day Candle Lighting -- ceremony every Nov. 2 draws hundreds of participants for the evening procession to the cemetery to place luminarias on the historic grave sites.
  • Annual Enchilada Dinner -- Is held on the first Saturday in March includes music and craft vendors.
The tiny town of Hornitos still has a few ongoing activities. (Gourd class cancelled because of flu.)

The tiny town of Hornitos still has a few ongoing activities. (Gourd class cancelled because of flu.)

Some Hornitos locals decorate their properties to resemble an old western town.

Some Hornitos locals decorate their properties to resemble an old western town.

Donkeys, chickens, pigs and goats might be seen in some of the yards and gardens. Human residents are a bit more hard to find but you might occasionally see a car or pickup truck traveling down one of the roads. If the doors of the Gagliardo General store are open one of the owners will likely tell you something about the local history.

Critter Residents of Hornito

Critter Residents of Hornito

hornitos-california-a-hidden-gold-rush-town

Brick buildings with tin roofs and iron doors survived the ever-present danger of being destroyed by fire. They date back to the gold rush era. Signs and memorial plaques throughout the area provide visitors with the historical backstory of Hornitos.

Times Have Changed

So what happened to the wild and dangerous reputation of Hornitos? With the passage of time and the growth of law enforcement, things settled down quite a bit. Gold began to be scarcer and harder to find. Many fortune seekers left to follow rumors of strikes in Alaska, Colorado or Australia. Cattle ranchers came into the area and established a more stable population.

And what about the bandit Murrietta? He was captured and executed. In an act that seems horrific today, he was decapitated so his head could be preserved in a large jar of alcohol and taken on tour around the state to prove to the populace that his reign of terror was indeed over. No one knows what happened to this artifact, but it may have been stored in a San Francisco building before the calamitous earthquake and fire of 1906. It was therefore probably destroyed.

Some residents of the town will tell you that his vengeful ghost seeks refuge in his old hideout. So if you should glimpse a headless apparition, beware.

Speak softly. Don't disturb the ghosts.

Speak softly. Don't disturb the ghosts.

If you are in the area, you may want to visit Hornitos to make some of your own discoveries. Your route will wind through ranch lands where you might see modern-day cowboys with horses and dogs, moving their cattle to new pastures.

Questions & Answers

Question: What happend to the Bridge Cafe?

Answer: I think. it might have been in operation in the '40s and early '50s. It is no longer there and I don't know where it was located.

Question: My great grandparents lived there in the late 50s early 60s. They were Elmer and Jennie Bell. Do you have any resident info?

Answer: I do not, but the Maripose Museum and History Center may have something. They have extensive archives for the entire county..

Question: What time of day is the enchilada dinner on March 2 in Hornitos, CA?

Answer: Their poster says 3:30 pm to 8 pm. They have live music and a craft fair during that time, too. You can check the Hornitos Patrons page on Facebook for more details.

Question: I just purchased an old stereoviews from the 1860s of the International hotel in Hornitas, Ca. Any idea where it was located or what happened to it?

Answer: Between the 1860s and 1880s, there were as many as three hotels in Hornitas (or Hornitos as it is now called). I don’t know if anyone knows the exact locations. Over the years many old buildings fell into disrepair or were burned or torn down. There were a few big fires during those years. It is not a very big town so the had to be somewhere close by.

Question: I had heard that the Hornitos of California were baking ovens used by the German population that lived there. Is there any truth to this?

Answer: From what I know, the early residents were mostly Mexican. Horno means oven in Spanish. Hornitos means little ovens. I have not heard that there were a lot of Germans there, though gold seekers from all over the world passed through at various times. (The German word for oven is Ofen with an umlaut over the “o”.)

Comments

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on August 27, 2020:

I'm not aware of that, but it may have been.

Stephen dwyer on August 26, 2020:

Was the western ghost valley partly filmed there. They used it as a ghost town.

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on August 13, 2020:

Those old family photos are priceless.

Deborah Elliott on August 12, 2020:

An ancestor of mine lived in Hornitos around 1880 and sent a portrait photo home to Liverpool England which I’ve just been given

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on March 27, 2020:

I have no information on the Opium Den, but it is a possibility. In the gold rush days it was a spot for all sorts of (now) questionable activity.

Janice Stout Yankura on March 27, 2020:

I was born in 1948 and grew up in the little town of Snelling, which is very close to Hornitos. I have been there many times over the years and find the town to be fascinating. When I was a little girl, a man had a shop full of rocks. He had a large stone with a garnet that he had cut and polished. I was so intrigued by it that he took a hammer and chisle and removed the garnet from the stone. I still have that garnet in my safe deposit box. I treasure it as a beloved memory of my childhood. When I was little I remember going into a wooden building with shelves going up the walls. A resident told me that it was an opium den. Young Chinese men who had come to Hornitos during the gold rush would come in, smoke opium, and lie on the wooden shelves to experience th effects of the opium. I have not been able to find that building as an adult, although I have spent hours looking for it. Does anyone have any information about the man with the rock shop or the opium den?

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on February 19, 2020:

Jesse, the Mariposa Museum and History Center has a huge archive of county records. I am not positive they have death records, but I suspect they do. You could give them a call and ask.

Jessie Austin on February 19, 2020:

My great great grandfather lived there in the 1870s and was a miner. He disappeared and we have not been able to find his death records. I would really like to come visit where he might have been at some time in his life.. Records show he worked on the Neills Ranch so he night have died on the ranch and his death wasn't recorded.

Marty Brogden on December 31, 2019:

I am told my great grandfather, Samuel Brogden, is entombed in a collapsed mine somewhere near Hornitos. Need to make it up there someday.

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on August 14, 2019:

Thanks for visiting my article. I had not realized that you are almost a neighbor. As an artist, I think you would appreciate the interesting look of the old buildings and ruins.

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on August 13, 2019:

I've driven past it never stopped before. I really need to check it out before it's all gone altogether. I have a dear friend with the last name Murrieta and I've asked him if he's related to the famous outlaw. He always looks at me with a scowl and grunts, yeah. Thanks for sharing your travels.

Blessings,

Denise

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on April 07, 2019:

I hadn't heard about that, I'll have to look for some info on that. It would be interesting to see if it looks anything like it does now.

David Kirkpatrick on April 06, 2019:

There is a movie called Ghost Valley, 1932 that is filmed there.

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on January 01, 2019:

Traveling there from the town of Mariposa, it takes a good 30 or 40 minutes of travel time each way, plus time to do your exploration. If you like this sort of thing, it is worth the trip. There are lots of fun things to photograph. Taking a picnic basket is recommended.

Sherry Venegas from La Verne, CA on December 31, 2018:

We have travel Hwy 49, but missed this little town off the beaten track. I love stopping at Historical and little known Monuments.

Kenna McHugh from Northern California on October 30, 2018:

Ahh! It is interesting he started in a California Gold Rush Town.

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on October 30, 2018:

Kenna, Domingo (aka Domenico) was apprenticed to a candy maker in Italy before he came to this country, so maybe it originated there.

Kenna McHugh from Northern California on October 30, 2018:

This is not too far from where I live (Sacramento). I'd love to check this place out and see it without the crowds. Perhaps, I'd see a ghost or two. Now, I have a trivia question: Where did Ghirardelli Chocolate originate?

ziyena from the United States on October 20, 2018:

Love this article! When I was a kid living in California, Dad would take us on ghost town adventures. Never been to Hornitos but we did visit the ghost town of Calico quite often. Also Silver City, New Mexico and Silver City in Idaho. Nothing like getting away from everything for the entire day :) Cheers

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on May 06, 2018:

Thanks, Finn. I added a little more which I think brings the whole thing together a little better. I took the photos with my iPad mini, and they turned out better than I expected. Thanks for your comments and suggestions.

Rochelle Frank (author) from California Gold Country on May 06, 2018:

Actually the flea market is an annual event, only once a year but it is a big deal. I don't think the residents would tolerate a monthly event.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on May 06, 2018:

What an interesting place you described! I would definitely like to visit it if I was ever nearby. That monthly flea market must draw people from far and wide if there are 100 booths.

Fin from Barstow on May 05, 2018:

Well a nice little article with some exquisite photographs. Would like to see it expanded or perhaps sections of it expanded upon and split into different articles.

Great photos included too.

You have a nice narrative style with some good lively descriptions of the various characters that once inhabited this place.

would definitely like to check it out if i am in the area