LodgingPacking & PreparationTransportationTravel DestinationsTravel Packages & Tours

Visit Friday Harbor in the San Juan Islands Near Seattle

Updated on March 14, 2017
Janda Raker profile image

Janda has explored four continents, by train, motorcycle, cross-country skis, mountain bike, snowshoes, sea kayak, hiking, backpacking etc.

Want to go to an island in the Pacific? Almost anyone can—to the lovely town of Friday Harbor in the San Juan Islands, only 70 miles northwest of Seattle, Washington. It’s a charming little community of about 2,000 residents, located on San Juan Island, the second largest of the alluring San Juans in the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

An Aerial View of Friday Harbor, WA

Friday Harbor, Washington, is a lovely community on San Juan Island, about 70 miles northwest of Seattle. This aerial view shows the beautiful vista that beckons to visitors.
Friday Harbor, Washington, is a lovely community on San Juan Island, about 70 miles northwest of Seattle. This aerial view shows the beautiful vista that beckons to visitors. | Source

Boats at Anchor in Friday Harbor Marina

Boats docked in the Friday Harbor Marina as seen through the trees from the hillside above.
Boats docked in the Friday Harbor Marina as seen through the trees from the hillside above. | Source

How to Get to Friday Harbor, Washington

Friday Harbor can be reached by several means:

  • by ferry, including Washington State ferries from Anacortes, WA, year round, or from Sydney, British Columbia, in nearby Canada, from May to October only. You can walk on, bring your bike or drive your auto. Reservations are recommended for the latter; (these can be combined with airport shuttles from cities in the area)
  • by private plane into the Friday Harbor public-use airport;
  • by small, regularly scheduled airlines, including Northwest Sky Ferry and also Kenmore Air, which lands in Roche Harbor on San Juan Island about 10 miles from Friday Harbor;
  • by seaplane from the South Lake Washington area in Renton, southeast of Seattle, into the Port of Friday Harbor; and
  • perhaps most fun of all, cruising by private boat, where you can dock in the marina at the Port of Friday Harbor, which has space for every type of boat, from dinghies to 150-foot yachts.

Transport to Friday Harbor, Washington

A Washington State ferry and a seaplane nearing the Port of Friday Harbor.
A Washington State ferry and a seaplane nearing the Port of Friday Harbor. | Source
View across Rosaio Strait from a small cruiser heading toward islands and on to Friday Harbor. Notice how thespectacular sky--half cloudy and half blue--is reflected in the sea.
View across Rosaio Strait from a small cruiser heading toward islands and on to Friday Harbor. Notice how thespectacular sky--half cloudy and half blue--is reflected in the sea. | Source

Arriving at Friday Harbor

The quaint but lively town of Friday Harbor is the center of business and tourism on San Juan Island and on the entire archipelago of the San Juan Islands. The town is about 1 mile wide and 2 miles long, on an island of about 55 square miles. If you come by conventional airplane, you'll land at the Friday Harbor Airport, on the southwest end of the little community, only a couple of blocks' walk from the center of town, or you can rent a car or take a taxi from there. Attire is quite casual so, however you come, you won't need more than a rolling carry-on for your belongings, as well as perhaps a daypack for rain gear. Several hotels and cafes are nearby, as well as shops, the visitors bureau and even a dog park.

If you travel by ferry, seaplane or private watercraft, you'll arrive at the scenic Port of Friday Harbor, on the east side of town. The marina lies on your right, and a short walk up the gradual hill in front of the ferry dock leads to Front Street, along the waterfront, where a right turn leads to Spring Street, the main thoroughfare of town. There you'll find restaurants (including even savory Mexican food), shops, museums, art galleries and nearby hotels, inns and b&bs. The community provides a medical clinic, drug store, movie theaters, bookstores, a hop-on/hop-off trolley, moped and bicycle rentals, and access to water sports, whale watching and many scheduled events.

Tip: Download the San Juan Island Chamber of Commerce Visitors Guide and Business Directory at http://sanjuanwa.usachamber.com/#/1/. It provides 36 pages of details, with locations and phone numbers for businesses and attractions all over the island, especially in Friday Harbor. The guide contains an excellent map of the town.

Fine Dining in Friday Harbor

The enticing entrance to garden seating at the Backdoor Kitchen, a popular upscale restaurant in Friday Harbor that welcomes diners and their pets.
The enticing entrance to garden seating at the Backdoor Kitchen, a popular upscale restaurant in Friday Harbor that welcomes diners and their pets. | Source

Exploring the Port Area of Friday Harbor

No matter how you reach Friday Harbor, be sure to explore the port area. After all, this community is called "Friday Harbor," a safe place for boats. In the marina itself, you'll see many unique craft and perhaps get to chat with their owners or operators. Also look for Popeye, the one-eyed female harbor seal who has enjoyed living for years in the quiet waters of the marina. And watching people disembark from the ferry or from a seaplane can be quite interesting.

Exploring Friday Harbor Marina

Many fascinating boats will likely be docked in the Friday Harbor Marina, including large yachts, cabin cruisers, and perhaps even a brilliant blue catamaran.
Many fascinating boats will likely be docked in the Friday Harbor Marina, including large yachts, cabin cruisers, and perhaps even a brilliant blue catamaran. | Source
A fascinating expedition kayak also rigged for sailing was tied up to the dock when we were there.
A fascinating expedition kayak also rigged for sailing was tied up to the dock when we were there. | Source
Several types of dinghies were parked at a dock in the marina. They were used to paddle out to anchored boats.One was an attractive, handmade wooden kayak.
Several types of dinghies were parked at a dock in the marina. They were used to paddle out to anchored boats.One was an attractive, handmade wooden kayak. | Source
Popeye, the one-eyed harbor seal is the long-time mascot of Friday Harbor Marina.
Popeye, the one-eyed harbor seal is the long-time mascot of Friday Harbor Marina. | Source

Taking Your Own Boat to Friday Harbor

If you’re an experienced saltwater sailor with your own seaworthy boat, you'll want to consider taking it to Friday Harbor. For you, this will be an easy trip, with some attention paid to tides and winds. And if you’re not experienced, this will be an excellent chance to take your first sea journey. If you’d like some assistance, locals and people who regularly travel in the area will be delighted to provide information, help you schedule your launch and passage through shallow areas, facilitate your arrival in Friday Harbor, including where to dock, and perhaps even “buddy-boat” with you.

Some boating organizations have gatherings in the area, and those and others are happy to help tourists get in touch with locals who can help with logistics, advice, etc. C-Dory is a popular brand of pocket cruiser, now built in Bellingham, WA. Their owners group is called the "C-Brats." You can post a request for information or companions, find info about their gatherings and even find boats to purchase on their website (http://www.c-brats.com/).

As you prepare to take your boat to Friday Harbor, there are many decisions to make. You'll need to consider where to launch, when, whether to go alone or with other boats, whether to sleep on your boat or in accommodations provided by the community of Friday Harbor, how long to stay and other such possibilities.

What Do You Know About Friday Harbor?


view quiz statistics

Accommodations for Boaters at Friday Harbor

If your boat is enclosed and large enough to sleep in, you won’t require a hotel for overnights in Friday Harbor. Everything you need is provided at Friday Harbor Marina including these:

• clean, modern restrooms with showers;

• potable water; and

• electricity for your boat.

And the village has the following:

• several inviting restaurants;

• a grocery store;

• a hardware store; and

• a laundry.

All of these are within walking distance of the marina.

Reservations and Cost of Accommodations

In summer—the best time for boating in the area—you may need to make a reservation (http://www.portfridayharbor.org/marina/for-visitors/rates-reservation/) for your slip at Friday Harbor Marina, depending on the size of your craft. If you don’t plan to sleep on a boat, reserve a hotel room for the nights you’ll be there. Rates vary, but a boat slip averages about $1 per foot of the length of your boat, per night. Hotel rooms can range from $100 to several hundred dollars per night.

Photo of Accommodations in Friday Harbor Marina

A modern restroom building with showers at the Friday Harbor Marina, with a classic sailing vessel reflected in the water alongside.
A modern restroom building with showers at the Friday Harbor Marina, with a classic sailing vessel reflected in the water alongside. | Source

Where to Launch Your Boat to Head for Friday Harbor

If you are trailering a boat to the Pacific Northwest, several convenient and attractive boat launches are available within a day’s boat trip of Friday Harbor. Some of the most popular are these:

• near Anacortes, WA, about 23 miles from Friday Harbor;

• near Sequim, WA, about 31 miles; and

• if you’re coming from the north, near Sidney, BC, Canada, about 24 miles.

So in most cases, boaters can cruise from launch to Friday Harbor in 2 to 3 pleasant hours. All of these launch sites provide convenient parking for your vehicle and boat trailer; some charge a small parking fee, so check ahead.

My husband, Lyle, and I had very little saltwater experience—a bit in the Atlantic off North Carolina and again in the Gulf of Mexico south of New Orleans. We were headed for a gathering of C-Dories at Friday Harbor and had been in touch with several C-Brats from the area, so we chose to launch our compact 16-footer at one of their favored launch sites--Cornet Bay, at the north end of Whidbey Island, about 10 miles south of Anacortes, WA. Whidbey Island is home to Whidbey Island Naval Air Station, a coveted post for those in the military. So, many, even a few men we met who had been stationed there, enjoy returning to launch their boats, contributing to the popularity of that site.

How to Reach Cornet Bay, a Good Possible Launch Site

If you are coming from the east or from busy I-5, like we did, take Exit 230, west of Burlington, and drive on Hwy. 20, also called Memorial Highway, about 8 miles to the west. You’ll cross the Swinomish Channel, at which point you’ll be on the eastern side of Fidalgo Island. Watch for views of beautiful Padilla Bay and later Fidalgo Bay. Continue west to where the highway splits. You’ll need to turn south to Cornet Bay, but you may want to take a short detour a few miles to the north, to the pleasant town of Anacortes--a “consolidation” of the name “Anna Curtis,” the wife of an early settler of the area. There the water of the bays surrounds you, and you could have a nice dinner or stay the night in a hotel before heading south to your launch site.

When you head southward, the highway winds about 6 miles to Deception Pass. The vistas along the drive are captivating, with small bays, channels, rivers and lakes seemingly around every turn. Then you’ll cross Deception Pass Bridge, over the gorgeous half-mile straight, to the larger Whidbey Island.

If you’re a fan of splendid views--shorelines with gentle waves sloshing; rocky outcroppings; deep green hillsides covered with lofty pines, firs, and hemlocks; cool, fresh air; elegant bridges; and the aroma of salt water--this setting is perfect for you. Follow Highway 20 through Deception Pass State Park at the south end of the bridge, about a mile, and then turn left on Cornet Bay Road. After about 1½ miles, watch for the boat launch on your left. Fuel is available, and several launch lanes are provided, with plenty of nearby parking for your tow vehicle. The slope of this boat launch is quite gradual, making for a pleasant launch, with docks alongside, as well as farther out, where you can tie up while you prepare your boat for the crossing.

A Map of the Cornet Bay Area, South of Anacortes, Washington

A markerDeception Pass Marina, Cornet Bay, Washington -
200 Cornet Bay Rd, Oak Harbor, WA 98277, USA
get directions

From I-5, take Washington State Hwy. 20, past Howards Corner, south across the Deception Strait Pass Bridge. Turn left on Cornet Bay Rd. to launch.

Cornet Bay, a Good Launch Site

A view from the south end of of Deception Pass Bridge on Hwy. 20 over the narrow strait between Fidalgo Island and Whidbey Island.
A view from the south end of of Deception Pass Bridge on Hwy. 20 over the narrow strait between Fidalgo Island and Whidbey Island. | Source
Small boats at floating docks in Cornet Bay, Whidbey Island, Wa. Boats and owners can stay overnight here or just stop to secure gear before crossing to Friday Harbor.
Small boats at floating docks in Cornet Bay, Whidbey Island, Wa. Boats and owners can stay overnight here or just stop to secure gear before crossing to Friday Harbor. | Source

Consider the Weather and Tides

Check the weather on your marine radio or online, and consider the tide tables, or watch for knowledgeable sailors in the area of the launch site or at the marina, in order to ask them about weather and tidal conditions so you can plan your launch and crossing times, to avoid the shallows during their twice-daily low tides. On the way to Friday Harbor, the shallower areas are between Decatur Island and Blakely Island and between Shaw Island and Lopez Island.

If you’re likely to be boating in this area for more than just this trip to Friday Harbor, you may want to purchase a cruising guide for the region. It can make your trip safer, simpler, and much more enjoyable. Several are available, but an excellent purchase would be A Cruising Guide to Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands. We love this wonderful book with charts, spectacular photos, details about moorages, wildlife, and scenery. It is so well written and produced that you’ll be glad you bought it even if you never leave home.


An Excellent Boaters' Guide

A Cruising Guide to Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands: Olympia to Port Angeles (International Marine-RMP)
A Cruising Guide to Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands: Olympia to Port Angeles (International Marine-RMP)

A Cruising Guide to Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands: Olympia to Port Angeles [Book] by Migael Scherer

 

The Cruise From Cornet Bay on Whidbey Island to Friday Harbor

The trip to Friday Harbor is a mini “grand tour,” crossing open water, always with islands in view, and winding through passageways between the islands. Because of our lack of experience, we chose to cross with two other boats, one with a very experienced couple who had spent much time in these San Juan Islands and the other with a relative beginner like we were. But after we’d made the trip out and back, we feel sure we would have had no problem on our own. So if you don’t have other boaters to cross with, just be cautious, be sure you have accurate maps and/or an electronic chart plotter, follow those maps, consider the weather, check the tides and you’ll do fine. This route is about 23 miles, from Cornet Bay to Friday Harbor, an easy 2-to-3-hour trip at a leisurely 10 mph.

After launch, follow this route:

  • Head north by northeast less than a mile across tiny Cornet Bay.
  • Then go west through Deception Pass, with a spectacular view as you pass under the high bridge, and past little Lottie Bay, around Lighthouse Point (where there is no lighthouse).
  • Next head northwest across Rosario Strait. It is the largest stretch of open water between Deception Pass and Friday Harbor, about 4 or 5 miles across, but always within sight of islands. It runs north and south, lying east of Decatur Island.
  • Make your way past the north shore of Decatur Island and northwest past the peninsulas on the northern end of Lopez Island.
  • Turn southwest between Lopez and Shaw Island.
  • At the southern point of Shaw, take a westward trajectory, where you’ll begin to see Friday Harbor about 3 miles ahead. Much of the boat traffic, including ferries, in the area will be heading to or from that most popular port.

Cruising From Cornet Bay to Friday Harbor

A C-Dory, a small pocket cruiser, crossing Rosario Strait, with some of the San Juan Islands in the background.
A C-Dory, a small pocket cruiser, crossing Rosario Strait, with some of the San Juan Islands in the background. | Source
The view between two charming tree-covered islands in the San Juans, with an inviting beach on one side.
The view between two charming tree-covered islands in the San Juans, with an inviting beach on one side. | Source
We followed another C-Dory, well-equipped, with a dingy on top and with an experienced crew, across Rosario Strait toward Friday Harbor, Washington.
We followed another C-Dory, well-equipped, with a dingy on top and with an experienced crew, across Rosario Strait toward Friday Harbor, Washington. | Source

A Map Showing the Route from Deception Pass Marina to Friday Harbor, Washington

show route and directions
A markerDeception Pass Marina, Cornet Bay, Washington -
200 Cornet Bay Rd, Oak Harbor, WA 98277, USA
get directions

B markerFriday Harbor Marina, Washington -
204 Front St, Friday Harbor, WA 98250, USA
get directions

Launch at Deception Pass Marina in Cornet Bay, go north in Rosario Strait to intercept the ferry route. Head west between islands to Friday Harbor.

What to Do in the San Juan Islands, Especially Near Friday Harbor

Of course, there are many other appealing locales beckoning, so you may want to plan extra time in the area. And if you’re a fisherman, you’ll want to try your luck, in open water, in peaceful bays, or even in lakes on the larger islands. Salmon is the coveted prize, but halibut, cod, crab, shrimp and many other sea creatures are there for the catching. Check online at the Department of Fish and Wildlife for the state of Washington for fishing regulations and permits or google fishing charters in the area.

As you cross and then wind around between islands, enjoy all the exquisite sights along the way. Remember that larger boats and sailboats, kayaks and canoes have the right of way. There will be a variety of vessels, including the large Washington State ferries, many pleasure boats of all types, possibly tow boats pulling rafts of logs or barges with supplies or equipment, tour boats, commercial fishing boats and others. And if you’re lucky, perhaps you’ll encounter dolphins, seals, orcas and perhaps even glimpse a humpback whale. Bald eagles, ospreys, cormorants and gulls often fly overhead or perch in high trees, watching for dinner.

Most days, the sky is a scenic attraction, with magnificent cloud formations interspersed with patches of vivid blue to match the sea. Much of the San Juan Islands area is in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, with Friday Harbor receiving only 25 inches of rain per year, much less than many nearby locales. Be sure to take your camera, or, with modern technology, even your cell phone will produce vivid images to remind you of your adventure and to share with friends and family.

Highlights of a "Mini-Cruise" in the San Juan Islands

Elegant sailing vessels ply the waters of Rosario Strait, but if you're in your own power boat, remember sailboats have the right of way.
Elegant sailing vessels ply the waters of Rosario Strait, but if you're in your own power boat, remember sailboats have the right of way. | Source
A group of kayakers off the wooded shore of an island enjoy paddling in the turbulent wake of passing boats. Remember kayakers have right of way over power boats.
A group of kayakers off the wooded shore of an island enjoy paddling in the turbulent wake of passing boats. Remember kayakers have right of way over power boats. | Source
A towboat pulling a raft of logs near Lopez island.
A towboat pulling a raft of logs near Lopez island. | Source
 An unconcerned gull nests atop the framework on the dock in the Port of Friday Harbor, watching boats pull in and out.
An unconcerned gull nests atop the framework on the dock in the Port of Friday Harbor, watching boats pull in and out. | Source

Arriving in the Port of Friday Harbor in Your Own Boat

Before you arrive at the Port of Friday Harbor aboard your own boat, check your maps or look online for details of Friday Harbor Marina (http://www.portfridayharbor.org/marina/). You’ll find how to contact them by cell phone or marine radio to make slip reservations, to get instructions for docking, for fees, etc. Up to 150 attractive watercraft in the marina are a welcoming sight. And you’re likely to have friendly neighbors in your area of the marina who will come out to help you secure your craft to the dock.

Once you’re docked in Friday Harbor Marina or if you come to the port by ferry or seaplane, go ashore to explore the comely community, most of it in walking distance from the marina. Many outdoor activities, fine dining and ice cream shops are available. Much of the community is pet friendly, so feel free to take Fido along. Our dog, Lindy, enjoyed walking the docks with us as well as waiting patiently under tables when we dined in outdoor restaurants in the village. Perhaps the most popular activity among boaters is sitting on a craft in the marina enjoying the scenery and watching the boat traffic. And sunsets are often spectacular in this tranquil setting.

Enjoying Friday Harbor Marina

Our dog, Lindy, enjoying the view from the dock beside our 16' C-Dory, See-Saw, in beautiful Friday Harbor Marina.
Our dog, Lindy, enjoying the view from the dock beside our 16' C-Dory, See-Saw, in beautiful Friday Harbor Marina. | Source
The lines of privately owned boats--in this case, C-Dories on the left, large yachts on the right--are highlighted by the flat, barely rippled water reflecting the vivid sky over Friday Harbor Marina.
The lines of privately owned boats--in this case, C-Dories on the left, large yachts on the right--are highlighted by the flat, barely rippled water reflecting the vivid sky over Friday Harbor Marina. | Source
Striking colors cloak a small, tranquil side bay cradling a few small houseboats and fishing boats as the forest ashore welcomes the setting sun.
Striking colors cloak a small, tranquil side bay cradling a few small houseboats and fishing boats as the forest ashore welcomes the setting sun. | Source

What's Your Opinion of Friday Harbor?

Would you like to go to Friday Harbor?

See results

Back to Your Launch Point: From Friday Harbor to Where You Started

If you came on your own craft, be sure to check weather and tide tables again before you leave your berth. And rather than heading straight back, you may want to go off in another direction to explore the area, take some side trips, perhaps stay on other islands before returning to your vehicle. As usual, you can learn a great deal about the area by talking with other boaters in the marina and the village.

We left Friday Harbor for Cornet Bay at the same time as our inexperienced companion who accompanied us on the way over. The experienced couple was taking their boat out to some other islands for a longer trip, and we had time constraints, so they just advised us as to when to launch and how soon we should pass the shallow areas, based on the tides. After we’d been out for a few minutes, we began to feel more confident, and the other boater felt the same. And the weather and view were spectacular. So we didn’t make any effort to stay with him on the way back. We did see him several times, but we felt like quite competent boaters by then. The journey back, the view as we passed under Deception Pass Bridge and the sight of our tow rig at Cornet Bay Marina brought smiles to our faces as we enjoyed our own conclusion to our “Pacific cruise.”

If you boated over on your private vessel, once you’ve reached your launch site and placed your boat back on its trailer, you may want to spend some time in the area, perhaps staying in a nearby hotel or camping, even in your boat, at Deception Pass State Park or in Washington Park, a municipal park in Anacortes. Both have many outdoor activities, wildlife, hiking trails and scenic views of the area, including the San Juan Islands.

Heading Back: By Ferry, Conventional Aircraft, or Seaplane

If you didn't bring your own boat, when your pleasant interlude at Friday Harbor has ended, you’ll likely head back to where you originally caught the ferry or boarded a conventional aircraft or a seaplane, ready for your return to life before you discovered the charm of of that lovely community.

The End of a Beautiful Journey to Friday Harbor

And whether you brought your own boat or arrived by another mode, once you're back where you began, you’ll no doubt often find yourself looking at your photos, sniffing for salt air, and reminiscing about the excellent trip you had to enchanting Friday Harbor!

Heading Back to Where You Started From

Our companion boat, another small C-Dory, motors near the wooded shore of Fidalgo Island as it approaches Deception Pass on the way back to Cornet Bay.
Our companion boat, another small C-Dory, motors near the wooded shore of Fidalgo Island as it approaches Deception Pass on the way back to Cornet Bay. | Source
The view from our small boat's pilot house shows the fine lines of Deception Pass Bridge on Highway 20, spanning the strait between Fidalgo Island and Whidbey Island, leading to Cornet Bay.
The view from our small boat's pilot house shows the fine lines of Deception Pass Bridge on Highway 20, spanning the strait between Fidalgo Island and Whidbey Island, leading to Cornet Bay. | Source
Our companion from the trip over to Friday Harbor awaited us in his 22' C-Dory, alongside a vintage sailboat and a classic cabin cruiser at the dock in Cornet Bay, a nice welcome after our memorable mini-cruise in the Pacific.
Our companion from the trip over to Friday Harbor awaited us in his 22' C-Dory, alongside a vintage sailboat and a classic cabin cruiser at the dock in Cornet Bay, a nice welcome after our memorable mini-cruise in the Pacific. | Source

© 2017 Janda Raker

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 4 months ago from The Caribbean

      Quite a comprehensive guide to enjoying Friday Harbor. Thanks for bring this to our attention. Seems like a fun doable.

    • Janda Raker profile image
      Author

      Janda Raker 4 months ago from Amarillo, Texas

      Thanks, MsDora, for stopping by and checking out my travel article about Friday Harbor. That's one of those places that seems difficult to get to, but it's really not! Many people who don't have boats come on the ferry, stay a couple of nights in a hotel, enjoy the community, and go back to the mainland, feeling like they're been abroad! Come try it!

    • profile image

      Vicki Schoen 4 months ago

      Thanks for writing about a place I would have never thought to check out. Now I might want to check it out in person. I hope you will continue to bring us informative articles on hidden gems in addition to well-known sites.

    • Janda Raker profile image
      Author

      Janda Raker 4 months ago from Amarillo, Texas

      Vicki, thanks for stopping by. Hope you do go to Friday Harbor! It's a lovely place! I'll try to post some more places you might enjoy.

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 4 months ago from Massachusetts

      Hi Janda. Great article. We have been to Friday Harbor a few times and it is definitely one of our favorite places. We have always taken the ferry and it's a relaxing and scenic journey. Not many people know about the San Juan Islands, but they are beyond beautiful and one of our favorite Washington state destinations. Great job.

    • Janda Raker profile image
      Author

      Janda Raker 4 months ago from Amarillo, Texas

      Hi, bdegiulio, thanks for the comments. I know you have written some beautiful articles about some fabulous places, so this is high praise from you! I agree, those islands comprise one of the loveliest places in the world!

    • profile image

      Carol Jolly Smith 3 months ago

      Have a trip to Washington planned. Will definitely add this to our sites. The article covers it all--and you include other helpful references. Thanks!!

    • Janda Raker profile image
      Author

      Janda Raker 3 months ago from Amarillo, Texas

      You're welcome, Carol. Glad you checked out my article on Friday Harbor. It is just a lovely place. I know you'll really enjoy it, no matter what you choose to do there!

    • profile image

      El and Bill Fiero 3 months ago

      What a great article -- well-written, beautifully illustrated and factual. We took our C-Dory Halcyon to Friday Harbor many times in our more than a decade of cruising over 41,000 nmiles of North America -- it is one of our favorite harbors. Thanks for writing such a fine description to inform others of this wonderful Pacific Island.

    • Janda Raker profile image
      Author

      Janda Raker 3 months ago from Amarillo, Texas

      Thanks, El and Bill, for your nice comments on my article about Friday Harbor. You two have been the inspiration for many of the trips we have taken on our little boat! Hope we all can continue to inspire others to get out there and see the beautiful world around us!

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 5 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm a life-long resident of the Puget Sound area, so I guess I'm a little biased, but I think the Sound and the San Juans are just about the prettiest country anyone will ever see.

    • Janda Raker profile image
      Author

      Janda Raker 5 weeks ago from Amarillo, Texas

      I totally agree with you, Billybuc. I'm from the High Plains, but I've traveled over a good portion of the world, and your area is one of the best! Love it!

      I hope you think I did an adequate job of presenting Friday Harbor to those who are not familiar with it.

      I've enjoyed many of your Hubs, and now Bill Di Giulio has pointed me to your Mailbag posts, as a good place to get more ideas on ways to get more followers, etc. Thanks for continuing to be helpful to those of us who are newer Hubbers.

    Click to Rate This Article