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Corio Model Railway Club 41st Exhibition

Suzanne is a creative artist from Australia who does her best to fulfill her dream of travelling the world!

The display of Gordon station harks back to the days of Victorian Railway and VLine trains.

The display of Gordon station harks back to the days of Victorian Railway and VLine trains.

Lauded as “the biggest Model Railway Exhibition in Provincial Victoria,” the annual Corio Model Railway Club’s 41st Exhibition showcased exhibits from around the world. Miniature trains abounded in delicately built landscapes—many Australian and with every detail correct.

With crowd-pleasers such as the circus train, Japanese urban express trains and outstanding dioramas, the Club excelled at putting on a good show and delighted many adults, families and children on the Australia Day weekend.

This year’s exhibition operated layouts in HO/OO and N Gauges. This refers to the scale of the models compared to real-life items, as well as the distance between the tracks on which the trains travel. A HO scale is 1/87, which means that an 870mm high object would be only 10mm high.

Further details on this year’s model railways include:

HO - Scale 1/87, Gauge 16.5mm
OO - Scale 1/76, Gauge 16.5mm
N Gauge - Scale 1/150, Gauge 9mm

There were lots of bargains available to be bought at the traders' stands, with engines going from AU$100+. I saw some AU$40 carriages, but if you’re a real enthusiast, you’d know that bringing AU$1,000 would be more appropriate to take advantage of the delightful trinkets on offer.

The huge amount of effort and patience that went into these displays was magnificent, and we enjoyed the show immensely. Following is a description of the main displays.

A great view of the level of detail put into this display - click on the image to enlarge.

A great view of the level of detail put into this display - click on the image to enlarge.

1. Gordon By Rod Roberts

Located at the top of The Great Dividing Range on the main line to Adelaide with a rising grade from both directions, Gordon was once a thriving and busy terminus station. In 1886, the line was extended to Ballan and a daily service was provided to Ballarat which became known as the Shangi Express.

The line between Bacchus Marsh and Ballan was opened in 1889, but it wasn’t until the line was upgraded three months later that it became the main line to Ballarat.

The layout depicts Gordon as it was in the late 1970s and the audience is instructed to “get down to eye level” to get the most out of the detail. My family did, and it was wonderful, so realistic you could almost believe you were there!

Apparently the real-life Gordon station is undergoing restoration by members of the Australian Railway Historical Society.

The display of Gordon station and the Ballarat railway line spans many metres and the landscape is true to life.

The display of Gordon station and the Ballarat railway line spans many metres and the landscape is true to life.

View of the minature carnival rides.

View of the minature carnival rides.

2. The Circus Comes To Town By Mario Faria

Want to see the circus world in miniature? This display was completed in O scale and has a steam train going around the perimeter of a beautifully decorated and electrically lit circus.

The stunning centrepiece is a Big Top, complete with miniature crowds, lights, a ringmaster and parading animals.

Based on an American circus, there’s Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, carnival rides (including a Ferris wheel), dodgem cars, a Wall of Death, a Grand Organ, a motorcycle stunt show, a merry-go-round, refreshment trucks and a balloon store.

In particular, it was really adorable to notice that builder Mario Faria adorned a trailer with the words “Mario Faria’s Circus” on the side.

Buffalo Bill's Wild West and some of the other attractions near the Big Top.

Buffalo Bill's Wild West and some of the other attractions near the Big Top.

The infamous trestle bridge. Click to enlarge the image and see the intricate work with the timber.

The infamous trestle bridge. Click to enlarge the image and see the intricate work with the timber.

Train pulling into the shipping container end of Cockroach Valley.

Train pulling into the shipping container end of Cockroach Valley.

3. Cockroach Valley By Kevin & Dot Bush, With Gary Taylor

Cockroach Valley is the latest version of the HO Australian layout developed over 40 years by Kevin & Dot Bush. It uses a code 83 rail and NCE DCC controls and is built on steel frames.

The trestle bridge was completely built from scratch, using a 6 mm rod as the upright poles and various sized pine for the stringers and cross bracing, which was purchased especially for the right look and strength.

The decking has over 800 individual pieces of timber and is glued to the stringers.

Constructed over a period of four weeks, the trestle bridge uses the principle based on the construction of the two trestle bridges on the Castlemaine-Maldon railway, at Winters Flat and Muckleford.

Full view of Cockroach Valley, which also spans many metres. There is an electrically lit town section at the end, with a  tunnel from which trains emerge.

Full view of Cockroach Valley, which also spans many metres. There is an electrically lit town section at the end, with a tunnel from which trains emerge.

Check out those detailed inclines and gravel!

Check out those detailed inclines and gravel!

4. Mittelstadt By Lutz Heerde

Based on a small fictional village in Central Europe, Mittelstadt has steam and diesel locomotives and rail buses, including various passenger coaches and good wagons of German Railways stock of era III & IV (1930 to 1990).

This single line-loop system is a bi-directional 16V AC 3 rail system, featuring Marklin track and accessories and rolling stock.

What really stood out about Mittelstadt were the bright colours used in the selection of buildings and the interesting amount of props used in the display.

From the miniature mushroom house to a church and houses lit up from the inside, Mittelstadt took a lot of work to create. It was also interesting to note the rocks built into the inclines and the different gravels used around the tracks.

Mittelstadt - A very colourful display!

Mittelstadt - A very colourful display!

Full length shot of Hawesdale. This display had a lot of action and was the right height for children.

Full length shot of Hawesdale. This display had a lot of action and was the right height for children.

5. Hawesdale By Peter Mitchell

The Hawesdale display was designed on a fictitious location on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales (England). The track plan is based on the location of Garsdale and the period modelled is between the nationalisation of British Railways and the end of regular steam engines.

This was a good display for the children because it was placed at a lower height, so they could see the miniature detail much more closely.

Containing a town, tunnels, a station with lots of miniature people, and detailed countryside scenery with cows, hedgerows and cottages in an English style, Hawesdale was running a few trains at once and was well placed in the centre of the main exhibition room for prime viewing.

The trains ran through the display, into one of the tunnels and then ran around behind the backdrop, so that they could be maintained during the show.

As you can see from the photos, Hawesdale is about 3+ m in length, and although it wasn't as long as some of the other displays, the colours used in it attracted many.

View of English countryside in detail. Once again, getting down to eye level was a great way to view this display.

View of English countryside in detail. Once again, getting down to eye level was a great way to view this display.

6. The Art Of The Diorama

This amazing set of dioramas are complete small scenes in O gauge and they are a great way to build and display models and/or structures. Dioramas can be stand-alone or be added together in a collection or to a railway system. In this set were Splitters Gorge, Diggers Bend, and an outback town connected to a rainforest.

The Diggers Bend Mining Company - A boxed, stand alone diorama with a small train appearing out of the mine occasionally.

The Diggers Bend Mining Company - A boxed, stand alone diorama with a small train appearing out of the mine occasionally.

An example of a connected diorama, from outback to rainforest with rail. The level of detail on the foliage is outstanding!

An example of a connected diorama, from outback to rainforest with rail. The level of detail on the foliage is outstanding!

The Fish Creek display shows a true-to-life view of how Fish Creek looked when it was in operation and certainly gave the audience a feel for what life would have been like around the area at that time.

The Fish Creek display shows a true-to-life view of how Fish Creek looked when it was in operation and certainly gave the audience a feel for what life would have been like around the area at that time.

7. Fish Creek By Tony Lampough

Located 170 km from Melbourne, near Wilsons Promontory on the Yarram Line, is Fish Creek. This N gauge layout has been built to have the feel of a small country town. Fish Creek station was opened during the 1890s and operated until 1980 for passengers (past Leongatha) and then in 1992, the railway line to Barry Beach servicing the oil fields in Bass Strait was closed.

The line was then dismantled and turned into the Great Southern Rail Trail. Fish Creek contained a goods yard with three roads. The yard has been demolished and the remaining station platform is in good condition.

A fantastic miniature beach from the Railways of Japan display.

A fantastic miniature beach from the Railways of Japan display.

A small bridge over a creek, which looks very true to life.

A small bridge over a creek, which looks very true to life.

8. Healesville By Paul Sutton

Designed on the town of Healesville, the display is a point-to-point operation, depicting the branch line from the Lilydale side of Yarra Glen to Healesville. It is controlled by an advanced digital control system using an integrated laptop.

A very long display of more than five metres, Healesville shows rolling Victorian hillsides and green farming areas with lush grass and miniature windmills. The little bridges over creeks, tractors and signal lights were a good opening display near the entrance to the exhibition.

Country Victoria in all of her green, lush scenery.

Country Victoria in all of her green, lush scenery.

9. Commercial Stands & Other Displays

There were a number of commercial stands at the exhibition. Outback Models by Laurie Green showed Australian kits, while Grizzly Flats, also by Laurie Green, showed mining and logging line running small porters on tight curves, a good example of a detailed O scene in a small area, including hand-built trees. O-zzie Modelling also had complete small scenes for sale and Stand #8 (unknown) had some exciting buildings displayed.

Other displays not covered in this hub include Railways of Japan, Little Oaklands, Bill's Backyard, Hairpindone, Jenke and an Airport West Hobbies Layout. Some photos are included below.

This exhibition is held annually, on the Australia Day weekend and admission is around AU$17 for a family. The venue this year was at:

Geelong West Town Hall
143 Pakington Street, Geelong West
(Corner of Albert & Pakington Streets)

For more information on exhibition dates, or joining the CMR club, please visit: http://www.coriomrc.org/

© 2014 Suzanne Day