Pueblo Montaño Chainsaw Sculpture Garden Honors Firefighters - WanderWisdom - Travel
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Pueblo Montaño Chainsaw Sculpture Garden Honors Firefighters

Dorothy is a Master Gardener, former newspaper reporter, and the author of several books. Michael is a landscape/nature photographer in NM.

This chainsaw carving by Mark Chavez shows a firefighter standing upon the head of a dragon.  A dragon is a firefighter's slang word for a particularly bad fire.

This chainsaw carving by Mark Chavez shows a firefighter standing upon the head of a dragon. A dragon is a firefighter's slang word for a particularly bad fire.

Dragon Claims Over 250 Beautiful Acres

In 2003, firemen in Albuquerque, New Mexico, slayed a dragon (a fireman's slang word for a particularly bad fire), but not before its fiery breath burned over 250 acres of beautiful wooded acreage along the Rio Grande River, the result of careless teenagers playing with fireworks.

During the catastrophic fire, trees were charred and hundreds of people were evacuated. The Paseo del Bosque trail and scenic land along the river were badly damaged. Many species of animals became displaced or died as a result of the fire. It was a sad time for many people, including one of the firefighters who helped to put out the blaze—Albuquerque native Mark Chavez.

After the fire, there were no mythical creatures to rise from the ashes, but Chavez provided a bit of a silver lining to the horrible fire. A chainsaw carver, Chavez brought his chainsaws, die grinders, sanders and propane burners to the site of the fire, where he turned many of the remaining cottonwood tree trunks into incredible works of art that have delighted many thousands of visitors from all over the world over the past several years.

You can see the results of his work in the photographs that accompany this article.

Mark Chavez carved all of the work shown in these photographs at the scene of a 2003 fire in Albuquerque. They are carved from remaining tree trunks at the site.

Mark Chavez carved all of the work shown in these photographs at the scene of a 2003 fire in Albuquerque. They are carved from remaining tree trunks at the site.

This chainsaw carving of a crane represents the many animals that were displaced or destroyed as a result of the 2003 fire.

This chainsaw carving of a crane represents the many animals that were displaced or destroyed as a result of the 2003 fire.

A Firefighter With a Creative Spirit

At the time of the fire in 2003, Chavez was a full-time firefighter who did chainsaw art in his spare time. He has since retired and has created over 3,000 chainsaw sculptures.

Chavez also organizes the AIBF (Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta) Chainsaw Carving Invitational held each year in October, which features professional carvers from all over the United States. The event raises funds for the Albuquerque Area Firefighters Random Acts of Kindness charity, which provides necessary items to victims of catastrophic events (fire, flood, storms, etc.).

This chainsaw carving by Chavez depicts the folklore legend, La Llorona (The Weeping Woman). Over the years there have been many different stories about the peasant woman who killed her children out of jealousy over the affection they were shown.

This chainsaw carving by Chavez depicts the folklore legend, La Llorona (The Weeping Woman). Over the years there have been many different stories about the peasant woman who killed her children out of jealousy over the affection they were shown.

How to Get to the Pueblo Montaño Chainsaw Sculpture Garden

You can see the Mark Chavez carvings in the Pueblo Montaño trailhead of the Paseo del Bosque. Take I-25 to the Montgomery/Montaño exit (Exit 228). Go west on Montaño and continue over the river. The Pueblo Montaño Picnic Area and Sculpture Park is one block east of Coors Blvd. on the south side of Montaño Road. The driveway/parking lot is opposite Winter Haven Road.

Note: The name Pueblo Montaño is in honor of the ancient pueblo village that is known to have existed in this location from about AD 1300 to mid-1400.

Mark Chavez at Work

The Evolution of Woodcarving to Chainsaw Sculpting

Necessity (being the mother of invention) created woodcarving as early man used bones and sharp rocks to shape pieces of wood into the tools they needed. Technology, as always, allowed people to become more elaborate in their carvings, and they began creating not only functional items but artistic and religious ones as well.

  • Andreas Stihl designed the first portable saw in 1926 called a bucking saw, which was electric and weighed 140 pounds. In 1929, he developed a gas version called the tree-felling machine, a one-man model with a helper handle on the bar end. It's easy to see why the idea of chainsaw carving didn't cross peoples' minds back then.
  • Stihl followed up with a two-man, petrol-driven chainsaw that he designed in 1938. By 1950, a single-operator, petrol-driven chainsaw was available that weighed a mere 35 pounds, which was considered very light at the time.
  • Beginning in about the 1960s, people began experimenting with carving as newer technology allowed them to use chainsaws that were lighter and provided increased maneuverability, but no one really knows who the first real carver was.
  • Today, chainsaws weigh around 15 pounds and there are thousands of master woodcarvers worldwide with varying skill levels and techniques.
This chainsaw sculpture by Mark Chavez depicts two wolves howling at the moon.

This chainsaw sculpture by Mark Chavez depicts two wolves howling at the moon.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2017 Mike and Dorothy McKenney

Comments

Mike and Dorothy McKenney (author) from United States on February 24, 2018:

We've only been here two years, and I'm amazed at the things I have found here in New Mexico to write about. Thanks for reading and commenting!

Sherri on February 24, 2018:

Great story and pictures! We are still new to the area & came up on the park by chance, how fun to learn the whole story!

Thank you