Blarney Castle Tour is More Than Kissing an Old Stone

Updated on October 29, 2019
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Scott S. Bateman is a professional journalist and travel blogger who wrote this article based on his first trip to Ireland.

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Kissing the Blarney stone, a tradition for more than two centuries, is among the most famous legends in Ireland. We decided to give the old saliva-covered stone a smooch on our first tour of Ireland.

According to the legend, anyone who kisses the stone atop Blarney Castle gains the gift of eloquence. People still line up to kiss the stone today -- sometimes waiting on steep castle steps for as much as three hours.

But kissing the Blarney Stone -- or pretending to kiss it for some people -- is only one reason to visit this major historical attraction in County Cork.

The castle itself provides an education of Irish history, and the gardens surrounding the castle are a surprising bonus.

Blarney Castle Tour Tips

Blarney Castle has existed in some form since the 10th century. The first building was made out of wood and replaced by a stone structure in 1210, according to the official castle Web site.

In 1446, Dermot McCarthy, King of Munster, replaced it with the structure that stands today. It is now owned by Sir Charles St John Colthurst, the 10th Baronet of Colthurst, who lives in the nearby Blarney House.

Visitors who pass through the welcome gates of the estate will walk along a path, cross a bridge and see the castle suddenly towering over the surrounding trees and land a few hundred yards ahead.

The North Wall provides that first view. It sits on an eight-meter rock cliff that provided the quarry for building Blarney. Look for the casemented oriel window that projects outward from the Earl’s Bedchamber. The three square holes provided the outlets for lavatory wastes.

Visitors stand in line to kiss the stone. The seated gentleman is an employee who prevents kissers from falling through the hole.
Visitors stand in line to kiss the stone. The seated gentleman is an employee who prevents kissers from falling through the hole. | Source

The entrance path goes to the left and curves up. Just at the top, right before the gates, look up to see the battlements where the Blarney Stone resides.

It is possible to see someone dropping their head and shoulders backwards through the opening in the battlement to reach and kiss the stone.

The inside of the castle is a series of small rooms and passageways that are largely empty. Rooms of note have plaques with information about their purpose.

At the lowest level under the tower house lies the dungeon, which reputedly had served as the castle’s prison. A nearby chamber may have housed the well that provided water during sieges.

One of the most dominant rooms in the castle is the three-story family room, which no longer has a roof. It does offer a view of the battlements and Blarney Stone above.

The climb to the top of the castle is somewhat tasking because of the number of steep and narrow steps. But getting to the top gives access to the Blarney Stone and a commanding display of the green countryside from the battlements.

Kissing the Blarney Stone -- or pretending to kiss it for some people -- is only one reason for a tour of this major historical attraction in County Cork.

Some people actually kiss the stone; others (like this photographer) wonder who else has kissed it and pretend to kiss it instead. Kissers grab bars to prevent a fall through the hole to the ground below. A castle employee holds on to the kisser.
Some people actually kiss the stone; others (like this photographer) wonder who else has kissed it and pretend to kiss it instead. Kissers grab bars to prevent a fall through the hole to the ground below. A castle employee holds on to the kisser. | Source

Kissing the Blarney Stone

Anyone who wants to kiss the Blarney Stone (or pretend to do it) must lie on their back, arch their head and shoulders down through an opening in the battlement and kiss the stone on the outside wall.

The wall has two handrails for gripping. As another safety precaution, a castle employee holds the visitors and guides them in the proper way to arch back.

A pile of coins next to him indicates that tips are accepted and may enhance his grip.

Cruise ships dock at nearby Cork and have excursion buses to Blarney Castle. On days when a cruise ship does arrive at Cork, the line to reach the Blarney Stone may require a wait of up to three hours, according to a castle employee.

Arriving at the castle when it opens is the best way to avoid the possibility of long lines. It also leads to the best photos.

The owner of Blarney Castle and gardens lives on the estate at Blarney House, which is open for tours part of the year.
The owner of Blarney Castle and gardens lives on the estate at Blarney House, which is open for tours part of the year. | Source

Castle Gardens

The Blarney Castle gardens were surprising in their size and beauty, but with one exception.

The Poison Garden next to the castle has poisonous plants from around the world, some of which stay in cages to protect visitors.

Continue east of the Poison Garden to reach the Fern Garden, which has more than 80 varieties. The 204-inch-high Dicksonia antarctica is the tallest species of fern in Ireland.

Trees of the arboretum stand everywhere and represent various rare species. Some of the threes are more than 600 years old.

Blarney House, visible from the battlements, is the home of Sir Colthurst. It is open to the public during the summer.

A double herbaceous border runs 90 meters long beneath an 80-meter rose pergola.

To the west of the castle, look for the waterfall, water garden, Rock Close, Witches Stone, Witches Kitchen and Druids Cave.

For anyone with extra energy, the gardens also have a 20-minute riverside walk, a 45-minute lake walk and a 90-minute forest trail walk.

The gardens contain many trails over 60 acres.
The gardens contain many trails over 60 acres. | Source
The castle gardens burst with color during the late spring.
The castle gardens burst with color during the late spring. | Source

Hours, Directions and Prices

Blarney Castle is one of Ireland’s most famous attractions and a popular stop for both cruise visitors to Cork and especially to the many visitors to Ireland who spend a week or more touring the country.

Anyone starting their Ireland tour in Dublin will need three to four hours to reach Cork and will find a stop along the way at the Rock of Cashel a way to break up the journey. Otherwise, take the N8 highway and follow the signs south for Cork and then the village of Blarney.

From Monday through Saturday, the castle and gardens are open for tours from 9 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. during May, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. from June through August, 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. in September, and 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. from October through April.

One Sundays, they are open from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the summer and 9 a.m. to sundown in the winter.

Blarney House is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday to Saturday, June 1 to Aug. 31.

Tickets are $18.00 Euros for adults, $14 Euros for students and senior citizens, $7 Euros for children ages 8 to 14 and $45 Euros for families of two adults and two children. Discounts are available online. Note that ticket prices are subject to change.

An 80-meter rose pergola runs atop a 90-meter double herbaceous border.
An 80-meter rose pergola runs atop a 90-meter double herbaceous border. | Source

Nearby Attractions

Blarney Village offers a small number of pubs and restaurants. Blarney Woollen Mills is a large retailer of Irish goods dating back to 1823.

Cork City is about six miles southeast of Blarney via N20. Attractions include Saint Fin Barre's Cathedral; the Cork City Gaol, a former prison and now a museum; Blackrock Castle, a 16th century castle that is now an observatory and visitors center; and English Market, the largest food market of its kind in Ireland and a fixture since 1788.

The village of Kinsale about 20 miles south on the coast is a fishing village and popular vacation destination. The nearby Charles Fort, next to the village of Summer Cove, is a star-shaped fort with five bastions. It was built in the late 17th century.

Blarney Castle Map

A
Blarney Castle:
Blarney Castle, Monacnapa, Blarney, Co. Cork, Ireland

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© 2019 Scott S Bateman

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    • promisem profile imageAUTHOR

      Scott S Bateman 

      2 weeks ago

      Thanks for the comment, Viet! I have to admit, it was a bit nerve wracking to hang my head and upper body upside down over a large hole three stories up. Fortunately, the castle employee had a good grip on me.

      And yes, the gardens were gorgeous when we were there.

    • punacoast profile image

      Viet Doan 

      2 weeks ago from Big Island, Hawaii

      I'm intrigued by this historic place and its kissing legend! I have a fear of heights so, whether backwards or upside down, no kissing for me on top of the castle! The gardens are gorgeous. Ireland is on my travel bucket list. Thanks for a great article Scott!

    • promisem profile imageAUTHOR

      Scott S Bateman 

      2 weeks ago

      Great comment, Vladimir. I love historical sites too, and this is one of my favorites. Honestly, I expected more of a tourist trap because of the Blarney Stone, but it exceeded my expectations. I hope you have a chance to go there.

    • ValKaras profile image

      Vladimir Karas 

      2 weeks ago from Canada

      Scott -- It's quite an interesting place, beside the beauty of flowers, which would probably get me all mesmerized and spend much of the time just circling around them, like unable to leave.

      Besides, I am freakishly fond of historical sites, the older the better, and this is one of those places where I would touch those stone walls and let my imagination run wild about who else was standing there at exactly that spot many centuries ago.

      Thank you for sharing it in this well written and illustrated article.

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